Quantcast
LoveBrownSugar


June 2017 archive

Women In Tech Demo Day NYC

Candid WIT Demo Day

Last Saturday, I had the opportunity to attend the Women in Tech Demo Day NYC hosted by Capital One in partnership with Women Who Code and AngelHack. I’ve had the pleasure of working with Capital One over the last year to spotlight some of their amazing associates and their corporation’s commitment to diversity and inclusion, so I was honored to attend their Demo Day. In a nutshell, Women in Tech Demo Day is an opportunity for smart and talented women to come together and pitch their tech-savvy ideas (whether it’s for an app or a web-based destination) to solve specific challenges that women in tech and business face.

Judges WIT Demo Day

This year’s theme was about solving the problem of unconscious bias and gender discrimination, whether it be in the workplace or elsewhere. As someone who primarily operates in the style and beauty industry, it was a refreshing change to be surrounded by so many brilliant tech-focused women. The teams could create projects in advance and use the time during WIT Demo Day to continue working on their ideas and were expected to present their projects to professional judges on pitch day. It was really incredible hearing the different presentations. I literally wanted to download every app – very cool.

Asmau Ahmed Christina Brown WIT Demo Day

One of the most touching parts of the Women in Tech Demo Day was hearing tech start-up founder and current Capital One employee Asmau Ahmed share her experience as a woman of color trying to secure funding for her startup venture Plum Perfect. Her experiences, as she explained, were not unique as many women (and women of color in particular) face these hardships. People just simply don’t believe you’re capable and inherent bias prevents them from taking a risk on you, regardless of how talented and innovative you are. Part of hearing these truths was disheartening. I mean knowing that she literally took her photo off of her LinkedIn profile to get more meetings with investors is a sad but true reality. But on the other hand, it was incredibly empowering to hear that she fought through adversity and eventually secured Series A funding for her idea.

Here’s one of the best takeaways from Asmau’s speech – a list of ways YOU and I can make a difference when it comes to women getting investment funding for their brilliant ideas:

1. Become an investor.

Now this may sound nearly impossible or like a far cry from anything you can do to help women get more funding for their businesses but it’s absolutely not far-fetched. Every time you make a purchase or support a Kickstarter from a women-led businesses, you are inherently making an investment in that business. You’re helping to keep the lights on, or providing raw materials or helping that business develop a new team. Your financial support is so important. If you can do BIG, by all means please do! Find a small company you believe in and pledge your support. But all investments – big or small – help.

WIT Demo Day Pitches

2. Advocate for having more women and diversity on boards.

Most of the decisions that are made to invest, from venture capitalist firms, are coming directly from their boards. It’s typically a group of investors and more likely than not, that board is comprised of wealthy white men. Diversity is severely lacking in this arena. Do what you can to be an advocate for more women and people of color being included in the decision-making. The more of us there are making these decisions, the less bias and discrimination.

3. Get the men in your lives to become allies.

This is often underestimated as well. Having strong support from men is really important. At the end of the day, the industry over-indexes in male support and dominance. Once we can change and defy perceptions about what you have to “look like” in order for you to be considered capable, more opportunities will open up.

4. Amplify your voices by helping each other.

This is a BIG ONE. I’m always preaching about the importance of collaboration over competition. Partnership and collaboration is so incredibly important, especially among women. We’re so much stronger as a unit. Asmau made such a great point by stressing that we have to stick together.

Christina Brown WIT Demo Day

5. Never settle. Don’t give up!

This was a great point to end on. At the end of the day, the strides that are being made in various industries, including the tech industry, are being made because there were women (our predecessors) who refused to give up.

Think about how much further my daughter’s generation will be if we push hard enough to open doors for women and girls everywhere NOW. I’m hopeful that with events like Women in Tech Demo Day, more women will get the exposure they need to make substantial changes in this industry. Thanks to Capital One for having me and for pledging their support to such an incredible movement.

Interested in attending WIT Demo Day? They’re headed to D.C next! Click here to register for tickets to attend or to pitch your ideas. Get in FREE with my code: “WITDDwithChristina”

I was invited to attend Women in Tech Demo Day on behalf of Capital One and was compensated for my time. All opinions expressed above are my own and not those of the company. For more information on Capital One Careers, click here.

Review: Baby Dove Product Line

Baby Dove Sensitive

As a Dove ambassador, I’ve been getting the opportunity to try out lots of their products, many of which I already use and love, but some completely new. When Dove announced the launch of their Baby Dove line, I knew I had to try it out on my 3 year old Cadence.

First of all, I had already been using their Sensitive Skin bar as part of Cady’s bath regimen. I took a trip to their headquarters last year and heard from a dermatologist that the Sensitive Skin bar was safe and approved to use for kids. Cadence’s skin is very delicate and she even has some spots of eczema, so I’m always very careful about the types of products I use on her. So when the Dove team sent me the entire line – including the Baby Dove Rich Moisture line and the Sensitive Moisture line – my first inclination was to try her out with the Sensitive line.

Baby Dove Lotion Wash

The Baby Dove Sensitive Tip to Toe Wash is the first product we tried. What I liked about the wash is that it was creamy and moisturizing. Cadence’s skin tends to get dry especially in the colder months, so I love moisturizing cleansers for her skin. Her skin was soft and not at all irritated after using it. I also like the fact that it’s hypoallergenic, fragrance free and tear free. This one is also rated and approved by the National Eczema Association, which I check often to determine which products to stay away from with her.

Next up, I prepped her for bed with the Baby Dove Sensitive Lotion, which was pretty light and absorbed into her skin quickly.

baby Dove regular wipes

Since Cadence is still in the stage where she needs help in the bathroom after going potty, I tested out the Baby Dove Wipes for her first on the potty. They’re not flushable, but they certainly do help with potty messes. I also stashed them in the car for snack spills and sticky fingers.

I decided to try the Rich Moisture line myself. Little known fact: I love Baby products…for myself. No, I’m not ashamed. I love how the entire line smells. It smells like freshly-powdered brand new baby with chubby edible cheeks! So yummy.

Baby Dove Wipes

Just like the Sensitive wash was creamy and moisturizing for Cady, the Rich Moisture line was pretty creamy as well. It washed off clean, which is important for the little ones. I tend to like washes that leave a little moisture behind but overall it was a nice consistency.

Dove Wipes

I also love the wipes. I keep a pack around the house for quick messes and another in Cady’s school bag for when we’re traveling back and forth. Overall these products are a great value. I’m so happy Dove has taken the charge with developing a line just for the little ones, especially with their campaign around #RealMoms and relieving some of the pressure we moms face to be superwomen everyday. Check out their #RealMoms campaign here:

This post is sponsored by Dove, a Unilever company. All opinions expressed here are my own and not those of the company.